Facts about UN SDGs

This information comes from the United Nations official homepage, and from the SDGs official website.

The SDGs is a part of the 2030 Agenda, which is a plan of action for people, planet, and prosperity. The United Nations(UN) created this agenda to strengthen universal peace through larger freedom. The SDGs seek to build on the Millennium Development Goals and complete what these did not achieve. Their purpose is to realize the human rights of all and to achieve gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls. The goals are integrated and indivisble and balance the three dimensions of sustainable development: the economic, social, and environmental. This is how the United Nations describe the SDGs:

"The Sustainable Development Goals are the blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all. They address the global challenges we face, including those related to poverty, inequality, climate change, environmental degradation, peace, and justice. The 17 Goals are all interconnected, and in order to leave no one behind, it is important that we achieve them all by 2030."
This is the greatest global challenge of all time - to completely destroy poverty in all its shapes, even extreme poverty. It is an absolute necessity for sustainable development. It's important that all countries and stakeholders, work together in partnership, to implement and follow this Agenda. The ultimate goal is to free the human race from the tyranny of poverty. We only have one planet to live on, and we want it to last and be sustainable for future generations. Therefore, it is important to heal and secure our planet. For this to happen, transformative and bold steps are needed urgently. It will eventually shift the world onto a sustainable and resilient path. The UN's goal is that no one will be left behind. In total there are 17 Sustainable Development Goals, and 169 targets, and they show the ambition of the Agenda.

People

The goal is to end poverty and hunger, in all their forms and dimensions, and to ensure that all human beings can fulfil their potential in dignity and equality and in a healthy environment.

Planet

The goal is to protect the planet from degradation, including through sustainable consumption and production, sustainably managing its natural resources and taking urgent action on climate change, so that it can support the needs of the present and future generations.

Prosperity

The goal is to ensure that all human beings can enjoy prosperous and fulfillinf lives and that economic, social, and technological progress occurs in harmony with nature.

Peace

The goal is to foster peaceful, just, and inclusive societies which are free from fear and violence. There can be no sustainable development without peace and no peace without sustainable development.

Partnership

The goal is to mobilize the means required to implement this Agenda through a revitalised Global Partnership for Sustainable Development, based on a spirit of strengthened global solidarity, focused in particular on the needs of the poorest and most vulnerable with the participation of all countries, stakeholders, and all people. The interlinkages and integrated nature of the Sustainable Development Goals are of crucial importance in ensuring that the purpose of the new Agenda is realised. If we realize our ambitions across the full extent of the Agenda, the lives of all will be profoundly improved and our world will be transformed for the better.

Content

Goal 1 - No Poverty

End poverty in all its form everywhere.

Eradicating poverty in all its forms remains one of the greatest challenges facing humanity. While the number of people living in extreme poverty dropped by more than half between 1990 and 2015, to many are still struggling for the most basic human needs. As of 2015, about 736 million people still lived on less than US$1.90 a day; many lack food, clean drinking water and sanitation. Rapid growth in countries such as China and India has lifted millions out of poverty, but progress has been uneven. Women are more likely to be poor than men because they have less paid work, education, and own less property. Progress has also been limited in other regions such as South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, which account for more than 80 percent of those living in extreme poverty. New threats brought on by climate change, conflict and food insecurity, mean even more work is needed to bring people out of poverty. The SDGs are a bold commitment to finish what we started, and end poverty in all forms and dimensions by 2030. This involves targeting the most vulnerable, increasing basic resources and services, and supporting communities affected by conclict and climate-related disasters.

Facts and Figures

Why is it important?

There are many reasons but in short, because as human beings, our well-being is linked to each other. Growing inequality is detrimental to economic growth and undermines social cohesion, increasing political and social tension and, in some circumstances, driving instabilities and conflicts. Economic growth must be inclusive to provide sustainable jobs and promote equality.

Goal Targets

What can you do to help?

Your active engagement in policymaking can make a difference in addressing poverty. It ensures that your rights are promoted and that your voice is heard, that inter-generational knowledge is shared, and that innovation and critical thinking are encourages at all ages to support transformational change in people's lives and communities. Governments can help create an enabling environment to generate productive employment and job opportunities for the poor and marginalized. They can formulate strategies and fiscal policies that stimulate pro-poor growth, and reduce poverty. The private sector, as an engine of economic growth, has a major role to play in determining whether the growth it creates is inclusive and hence contributes to poverty reduction. It can promote economic opportunities for the poor, focusing on segments of the economy where most of the poor are active, namely on micro and small enterprises and those operating in the informal sector. The academic and education community have a major role in increasing the awareness about the impact of poverty. Science provides the foundation for new and sustainable approaches, solutions and technologies to tackle the challenges of reducing poverty and achieving sustainable development. The contribution of science to end poverty has been significant. For example, it has enabled access to safe drinking water, reduced deatgs caused by water-borne diseases, and improved hygiene to reduce health risks related to unsafe drinking water and lack of sanitation.

Goal 2 - Zero Hunger

End hunger, achieve food security and imporoved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.

The number of undernourished people has droppped by almost half in the past two decades because of rapid economic growth and increased agricultural productivity. Many developing countries that used to suffer from famine and hunger can now meet their nutritional needs. Central and East Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean have all made huge progress in eradicating extreme hunger. Unfortunately, extreme hunger and malnutrition remain a huge barrier to development in many countries. There are 821 million people estimated to be chronically undernourished as of 2017, often as a direct consequence of environmental degradation, drought and biodiversity loss. Over 90 million children under five are dangerously underweight. Undernourishment and severe food insecurity appear to be increasing in almost all regions of Africa, as well as in South America. The SDGs aim to end all forms of hunger and malnutrition by 2030, making sure all people - especially children - have sufficient and nutritious food all year. This involves promoting sustainable agriculture, supporting small-scale farmers and equal access to land, technology and markets. It also requires international cooperation to ensure investment in infrastructure and technology to improve agricultural productivity.

Facts and Figures

Hunger

Food Security

Goal Targets

Why is it important?

We all want our families to have enough food to eat what is safe and nutritious. A world with zero hunger can positively impact our economies, health, education, equality and social development. It's a key piece of building a better future for everyone. Additionally, with hunger limiting human development, we will not be able to achieve the other sustainable development goals such as education, health and gender equality. The food and agriculture sector offers key solutions for development, and is central for hunger and poverty eradication.

What can you do to help?

You can make changes in your own life - at home, at work and in the community - by supporting local farmers or markets and making sustainable food choices, supporting good nutrition for all, and fighting food waste. You can also use your power as a consumer and voter, demanding businesses and governments make the choices and changes that will make Zero Hunger a reality. Join the conversation, whether on social media platforms or in your local communities.

Goal 3 - Good Health and Well-being

Ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeind for all at all ages.

We have made great progress against several leading causes of death and disease. Life expectancy has increased dramatically; infant and maternal mortality rates have declined, we've turned the tide on HIV and malaria deaths have halved. Good health is essential to sustainable development and the 2030 Agenda reflects the complexity and internconnectedness of the two. It takes into account widening economic and social inequalities, rapid urbanization, threats to the climate and the environment, the continuing burden of HIV and other infectious diseases, and emerging challenges such as noncommunicable diseases. Universal health coverage will be integral to achieving SDG 3, ending poverty and reducing inequalities. Emerging global health priorities not explicitly included in the SDGs, including antimicrobial resistance, also demand action. But the world is off-track to achieve the health-related SDGs. Progress has been uneven, both between and within countries. There's a 31-year gap between the countries with the shortest and longest life expectancies. And while some countries have made impressive gains, national averages hide that many are being left behind. Multisectoral, rights-based and gender-sensitive approaches are essential to address inequalities and to build good health for all.

Facts and Figures

Child Health

Maternal Health

HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases

Goal Targets

Why is it important?

Ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being for all at all ages is important to building prosperous societies. Major progress has been made in improving the health of millions of people. Maternal and child mortality rates have been reduced, life expectancy continues to increase globally, and the fight against some infectious diseases has made steady profress. However, in the case of other diseases such as malaria and tuberculosis, progress has slowed or stalled. At least half the world's population are still without access to essential health services. In rich and poor countries alike, a health emergency can push people into bankruptcy or poverty. Concentrated efforts are required to achieve universal health coverage and sustainable financing for health; address the growing burden och noncommunicable diseases, tackle antimicrobial resistance and environmental factors contributing to ill health.

What can you do to help?

You can start by promoting and protecting your own health and the health of those around you, by making well-informed choices, practicing safe sex and vaccinating your children. You can raise awareness in your community about the importance of good health, healthy lifestyles as well as people's rights to quality health care services, especially for the most vulnerable such as women and children. You can also hold your government, local leaders, and other decision-makers accountable to their commitments to improve people's access to health and health care.

Goal 4 - Quality Education

Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.

Since 2000, there has been enormous progress in achieving the target of universal primary education. The total enrolment rate in developing regions reached 91 percent in 2015, and the worldwide number of children out of school has dropped by almost half. There has also been a dramatic increase in literacy rates, and many more girls are in schoool than ever before. These are all remarkable successes. Progress has also been tough in some developing regions due to high levels of poverty, armed conflicts and other emergencies. In Western Asia and North Africa, ongoing armed conflict has seen an increase in the number of children out of school. This is a worrying trend. While sub-Saharan Africa made the greatest progress in primary school enrolment among all developing regions - from 52 percent in 1990, up to 78 percent in 2012 - large disparities still remain. Children from the poorest households are up to four times more likely to be out of school than those of the richest households. Disparities between rural and urban areas also remain high. Achieving inclusive and quality education for all reaffirms the belief that education is one of the most powerful and proven vehicles for sustainable development. This goal ensures that all girls and boys complete free primary and secondary schooling by 2030. It also aims to provide equal access to affordable vocational training, to eliminate gender and wealth disparities, and achieve universal access to a quality higher education.

Facts and Figures

Goal Targets

Why is it important?

Education enables upward socioeconomic mobility and is a key to escaping property. Education is also essential to achieving many other SDGs. When people are able to get quality education they can break from the cycle of poverty. Education helps to reduce inequalities and to reach gender equality. In fact, one extra year of education is associated with a reduction of the Gini coefficient by 1.4 percentage points. Education empowers people everywhere to live more healthy and sustainable lives. Education is also crucial to fostering tolerance between people and contributes to more peaceful societies.

What can you do to help?

Ask our governments to place education as a priority in both policy and practice. Lobby our goverments to make firm commitments to provide free primary school education to all, including vulnerable and marginalized groups. Encourage the private sector to invest resources in the development of educational tools and facilities. Urge NGOs to partner with youth and other groups to foster the importance of education within local communities.

Goal 5 - Gender Equality

Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.

Ending all discrimination against women and girls is not only a basic human right, it's crucial for sustainable future; it's proven that empowering women and girls helps economic growth and development. UNDP has made gender equality central to its work and we've seen remarkable progress in the past 20 years. There are more girls in school now compared to 15 years ago, and most regions have reached gender parity in primary education. But although there are more women than ever in the labour markets, there are still large inequalities in some regions, with women systematically denied the same work rights as men. Sexual violence and exploitation, the unequal division of unpaid care and domestic work, and discrimination in public office all remain huge barriers. Climate change and disasters continue to have a disproportionate effect on women and children, as do conflict and migration. It is vital to give women equal rights land and property, sexual and reproductive health, and to technology and the Internet. Today there are more women in public office than ever before, but encouraging more women leaders will help achieve greater gender equality.

Facts and Figures

Goal Targets

Why is it important?

Regardless of where you live, gender equality us a fundamental human right. Advancing gender equality is critical to all areas of a healthy society, from reducing poverty to promoting health, education, protection and the well-being of girls and boys. Investing in education programmes for girls and increasing the age at which they marry can return $5 for every dollar spent. Investing in programs improving income-generating activities for women can return $7 dollars for every dollar spent. Gender equality is not only a fundamental human right, but a necessary foundation for a peaceful, prosperous, and sustainable world.

What can you do to help?

If you are a girl, you can stay in school, help empower your female classmates to do the same and fight for your right to access sexual and reproductive health services. If you are a woman, you can address unconscious biases and implicit associations that form an unintended and often invisble barrier to equal opportunity. If you are a man or a boy, you can work alongside women and girls to achieve gender equality and embrace healthy, respectful relationships. You can fund education campaigns to curb cultural practices like female genital mutilation and change harmful laws that limit the rights of women and girls and prevent them from achieving their full potential.

Goal 6 - Clean Water and Sanitation

Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all.

Water scarcity affects more than 40 percent of people, an alarming figure that is projected to rise as temperatures do. Although 2.1 billion people have improved water sanitation since 1990, dwindling drinking water supplies are affecting every continent. More and more countries are experiencing water stress, and increasing drought and desertification is already worsening these trends. By 2050 it is projected that at least one in four people will suffer recurring water shortages. Safe and affordable drinking water for all by 2030 requires we invest in adequate infrastructure, provide sanitation facilities, and encourage hygiene. Protecting and restoring water-related ecosystems is essential. Ensuring universal safe and affordable drinking water involves reaching over 800 million people who lack basic services and improving accessibility and safety of services for over two billion. In 2015, 4.5 billion people lacked safely managed sanitation services (with adequately disposed or treated excreta) and 2.3 billion lacked even basic sanitation.

Facts and Figures

Goal Targets

Why is it important?

The demand for water has outpaced population growth, and half the world's population is already experiencing severe water scarcity at least one month a year. Access to water, sanitation and hygiene is a human right, yet billions are still faced with daily challenges accessing even the most basic of services. 3 in 10 people lack access to safely managed drinking water services. About 3 billion people lack access to basic sanitation services, such as toilets or latrines. More than 80 percent of wastewater resulting from human activities is discharged into rivers or sea without any treatment, leading to pollution. Clean, accessible water for all is an essential part of the world we want to live in.

What can you do to help?

Civil society organizations should work to keep governments accountable, invest in water research and development, and promote the inclusion of women, youth and indigenous communities in water resource governance. Generating awareness of these roles and turning them into action will lead to win-win results and increased sustainability and integrity for both humans and ecological systems. You can also get involved in the World Water Day and World Toilet Day campaigns that aim to provide information and inspiration to take action on hygiene issues.

Goal 7 - Affordable and Clean Energy

Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable, and modern energy for all.

Between 2000 and 2016, the number of people with electricity increased from 78 to 87 percent, and the numbers without electricity dipped to just below 1 billion. Yet as the population continues to grow, so will the demand for cheap energy, and an economy reliant on fossil fuels is creating drastic changes to our climate. Investing in solar, wind and thermal power, improving energy productivity, and ensuring energy for all is vital if we are to achieve SDG 7 by 2030. Expanding infrastructure and upgrading technology to provide clean and more efficient energy in all countries will encourage growth and help the environment.

Facts and Figures

Goal Targets

Why is it important?

For many decades, fossil fuels such as coal, oil or gas have been major sources of electricity production, but burning carbon fuels produces large amounts of greenhouse gases which cause climate change and have harmful impacts on people's well-being and the environment. This affects everyone, not just a few. Moreover, global electricity use is rising rapidly. In a nutshell, without a stable electricity supply, countries will not be able to power their economies. Energy is central to nearly every major challenge and opportunity.

What can you do to help?

Countries can accelerate the transition to an affordable, reliable, and sustainable energy system by investing in renewable energy resources, prioritizing energy efficient practices, and adopting clean energy technologies and infrastructure. Businesses can maintain and protect ecosystems to be able to use and further develop hydropower sources of electricity and bioenergy, and commit to sourcing 100% of operational electricity needs from renewable sources. Employers can reduce the internal demand for transport by prioritizing telecommunications and incentivize less energy intensive modes such as train travel over auto and air travel. Investors can invest more in sustainable energy services, bringing new technologies to the market quickly from a diverse supplier base. You can save electricity by plugging appliances into a power strip and turning them off completely when not in use, including your computer. You can also bike, walk or take public transport to reduce carbon emissions.

Goal 8 - Decent Work and Economic Growth

Promote sustained, inclusive, and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all.

Over the past 25 years the number of workers living in extreme poverty has declined dramatically, despite the lasting impact of the 2008 economic crisis and global recession. In developing countries, the middle class now makes up more than 34 percent of total employment - a number that has almost tripled between 1991 and 2015. However, as the global economy continues to recover we are seeing slower growth, widening inequalities, and not enough jobs to keep up with a growing labour force. According to the International Labour Organization, more than 204 million people were unemployed in 2015. The SDGs promote sustained economic growth, higher levels of productivity and technological innovation. Encouraging entrepreneurship and job creation are key to this, as are effective measures to eradicate forced labour, slavery and human trafficking. With these targets in mind, the goal is to achieve full and productive employment, and decent work, for all women and men by 2030.

Facts and Figures

Goal Targets

Why is it important?

Society as a whole benefits when more people are being productive and contributing to their country's growth. Productive employment and "decent work" are key elements to achieving fair globalization and poverty reduction. In addition, unemployment can lead to unrest and disrupt peace if it is left unaddressed. Sustainable economic growth will require societies to create the conditions that allow people to have quality jobs.

What can you do to help?

Providing youth the best opportunity to transition to a decent job calls for investing in education and training of the highest possible quality, providing youth with skills that match labour market demands, giving them access to social protection and basic services regardless of their contract type, we well as levelling the playing field so that all aspiring youth can attain productive employment regardless of their gender, income level or socioeconomic background. Governments can work to build dynamic, sustainable, innovative and people-centred economies, promoting youth employment and women's economic empowerment, in particular, and decent work for all. Local authorities and communities can renew and plan their cities and human settlements so as to foster community cohesion and personal security and to stimulate innovation and employment.

Goal 9 - Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure

Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation.

Investment in infrastructure and innovation are crucial drivers of economic growth and development. With over half the world population now living in cities, mass transport and renewable energy are becoming ever more important, as are the growth of new industries and information and communication technologies. Technological progress is also key to finding lasting solutions to both economic and environmental challenges, such as providing new jobs and promoting energy efficiency. Promoting sustainable industries, and investing in scientific research and innovation, are all important ways to facilitate sustainable development. More than 4 billion people still do not have access to the Internet, and 90 percent are from the developing world. Bridging this digital divide is crucial to ensure equal access to information and knowledge, as well as foster innovation and entrepreneurship.

Facts and Figures

Goal Targets

Why is it important?

Inclusive and sustainable industrialization, together with innovation and infrastructure, can unleash dynamic and competitive economic forces that generate employment and income. They play a key role in introducing and promoting new technologies, facilitating international trade and enabling the efficient use of resources. The growth of new industries means improvement in the standard of living for many of us. Also, if industries pursue sustainability, this approach will have a positive effect on the environment. Climate change affects all of us. Investments in ifrastructure are crucial to achieving sustainable development.

What can you do to help?

Establish standards and promote regulations that ensure company projects and initiatives are sustainably managed. Collaborate with NGOs and the public secotr to help promote sustainable growth within developing countries. Think about how industry impacts on your life and well-being and use social media to push for policymakers to prioritize the SDGs.

Goal 10 - Reduced Inequalities

Reduce inequality within and among countries.

Income inequality is on the rise - the richest 10 percent have up to 40 percent of global income whereas the poorest 10 percent earn only between 2 to 7 percent. If we take into account population growth inequality in developing countries, inequality has increased by 11 percent. Income inequality has increased in nearly everywhere in recent decades, but at different speeds. It's lowest in Europe and highest in the Middle East. These widening disparities require sound policies to empower lower income earners, and promote economic inclusion of all regardless of sex, race or ethnicity. Income inequality requires global solutions. This involves improving the regulation and monitoring of financial markets and institutions, encouraging development assistance and foreign direct investment to regions where the need is greatest. Facilitating the safe migration and mobility of people is also key to bridging the widedning divide.

Facts and Figures

Goal Targets

Why is it important?

In today's world, we are all interconnected. Problems and challenges, be they poverty, climate change, migration or economic crises are never just confined to one country or region. Even the richest countries still have communities living in abject poverty. The oldest democracies still wrestle with racism, homophobia and transphobia, and religious intolerance. Global inequality affects us all, no matter who we are or where we are from. To reduce Inequalities, policies should be universal in principle, paying attention to the needs of disadvantaged and marginalized populations.

What can you do to help?

Reducing inequality requires transformative change. Greater efforts are needed to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, and invest more in health, education, social protection and decent jobs especially for young people, migrants and other vulnerable communities. Within countries, it is important to empower and promote inclusive social and economic growth. We can ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of income if we eliminate discriminatory laws, policies and practices. Among countries, we need to ensure that developing countries are better represented in decisionmaking on global issues so that solutions can be more effective, credible and accountable. Governments and other stakeholders can also promote safe, regular and responsible migration, including through planned and well-managed policies, for the millions of people who have left their homes seeking better lives due to war, discrimination, poverty, lack of opportunity and other drivers of migration.

Goal 11 - Sustainable Cities and Communities

Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable.

More than half of us live in cities. By 2050, two-thirds of all humanity - 6.5 billion people - will be urban. Sustainable development cannot be achieved without significantly transforming the way we build and manage our urban spaces. The rapid growth of cities - as a result of rising populations and increasing migration - has led to a boom in mega-cities, especially in the developing world, and slums are becoming a more significant feature of urban life. Making cities sustainable means creating careed and business opportunities, safe and affordable housing, and building resilient societies and economies. It involves investment in public transport, creating green public spaces, and improving urban planning and management in participatory and inclusive ways.

Facts and Figures

Goal Targets

Why is it important?

All these issues will eventually affect every citizen. Inequality can lead to unrest and insecurity, pollution deteriorates everyone's health and affects worker's productivity and therefore the economy, and natural disasters have the potential to disrupt everyone's lifestyles. There needs to be a future in which cities provide opportunities for all, with access to basic services, energy, housing, transportation and more.

What can you do to help?

Take an active interest in the governance and management of your city. Advocate for the kind of city you believe you need. Develop a vision for your building, street, and neighbourhood, and act on that vision. Are there enough jobs? Can your children walk to school safely? Can you walk with your family at night? How far is the nearest public transport? What's the air quality like? What are your shared public spaces like? The better the conditions you create in your community, the greater the effect on quality of life.

Goal 12 - Responsible Consumption and Production

Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns.

Achieving economic growth and sustainable development requires that we urgently reduce our ecological footprint by changing the way we produce and consume goods and resources. Agriculture is the biggest user of water worldwide, and irrigation now claims close to 70 percent of all freshwater for human use. The efficient management of our shared natural resources, and the way we dispose of toxic waste and pollutants, are important targets to achieve this goal. Encouraging industries, businesses and consumers to recycle and reduce waste is equally important, as is supporting developing countries to move towards more sustainable patterns of consumption by 2030. A large share of the world population is still consuming far too little to meet even their basic needs. Halving the per capita of global food waste at the retailer and consumer levels is also important for creating more efficient production and supply chains. This can help with food security, and shift us towards a more resource efficient economy.

Facts and Figures

Water

Energy

Food

Goal Targets

Why is it important?

Economic and social progress over the last century has been accompanied by environmental degradation that is endangering the very systems on which our future development and very survival depend. If we don't act to change our consumption and production patterns, we will cause irreversible damage to our environment. Responsible production and consumption.

What can you do to help?

As a Business

It's in businesses' interest to find new solutions that enable sustainable consumption and production patterns. A better understanding of environmental and social impacts of products and services is needed, both of product life cycles and how these are affected by use within lifestyles. Identifying "hot spots" within the value chain where interventions have the greatest potential to improve the environmental and social impact of the system as a whole is a crucial first step. Businesses can also use their innovative power to design solutions that can both enable and inspire individuals to lead more sustainable lifestyles, reducing impacts and improving well-being.

As a Consumer

There are two main ways to help: 1. Reducing your waste and 2. Being thoughtful about what you buy and choosing a sustainable option whenever possible. Reducing our waste can be done in many ways, from ensuring you don't throw away food to reducing your consumption of plastic - one of the main pollutants of the ocean. Carrying a reusable bag, refusing to use plastic straws, and recycling plastic bottles are good ways to do your part every day. Making informed purchases about what we're buying also helps. For example, the textile industry today is the second largest polluter of clean water after agriculture, and many fashion companies exploit textile workers in the developing world. If you can buy from sustainable and local sources you can make a difference as well as exercising pressure on businesses to adopt sustainable practices.

Goal 13 - Climate Action

Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.

There is no country that is not experiencing the drastic effects of climate change. Greenhouse gas emissions are more than 50 percent higher than in 1990. Global warming is causing long-lasting changes to our climate system, which threatens irreversible consequences if we do not act. The annual average economic losses from climate-related disaster are in the hundreds of billion of dollars. This is not to mention the human impact of geo-physical disasters, which are 91 percent climate-related, and which between 1998 and 2017 killed 1.3 million people, and left 4.4 billion injured. The goal aims to mobilize US$100 billion annually by 2020 to address the needs of developing countries to both adapt to climate change and invest in low-carbon development. Supporting vulnerable regions will directly contribute not only to Goal 13 but also to the other SDGs. These actions must also go hand in hand with efforts to integrate disaster risk measures, sustainable natural resource management, and human security into national development strategies. It is still possible, with strong political will, increased investment, and using existing technology, to limit the increase in global mean temperature to two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, aiming at 1.5 degrees Celsius, but this requires urgent and ambitious collective action.

Facts and Figures

Thanks to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change we know

Goal Targets

Why is it important?

As greenhouse gas levels continue to climb, climate change is occuring at much higher rates than anticipated, and its effects are evident worldwide. By addressing climate change, we can build a sustainable world for everyone. But we need to act now. Severe weather and rising sea levels are affecting people and their property in developed and developing countries. From a small farmer in the Philippines to a businessman in London, climate change is affecting everything, especially the poor and vulnerable, as well as marginalized groups like women, children and the elderly. Climate change is a global challenge that affects everyone, everywhere.

What can you do to help?

Food

What we eat has major implications for climate change. The destruction of rainforests to create land for agriculture, along with growing demand for meat, are major contributors to the increasing greenhouse gases which are taking a significant toll on climate and global food security. To top it off, we waste about one-third of the food that is produced. But more people are taking a closer look at what they are eating and the impacts of their diets on their health and environment. More and more chefs and other food suppliers are focusing on local and organic produce and shifting away from meat-heavy meals and fast food. They are joined by a growing movement of people changing the way they cook and eat.

Your Challenge! Cook up dishes that are not only delicious but also god for the planet and good for us - reducing meat and emphasizing diverse vegetarian ingredients instead.

Fashion

Making clothes has a huge impact on climate change. The textile industry contributes around ten percent of global greenhouse gas emissions - it uses more energy than the aviation and shipping industry combined, according to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The industry's impact is not limited to global carbon emissions. It also produces about 20 percent of global waste water and 85 percent of textiles end up in landfills or are incinerated when most of these materials could be reused.

Your Challenge! Upcycle your old clothes for new looks and share your creations on social media using.

Join the Movement

Goal 14 - Life Below Water

Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas, and marine resources for sustainable development.

The world's oceans - their temperature, chemistry, currents and life - drive global systems that make the Earth habitable for humankind. How we manage this vital resource is essential for humanity as a whole, and to counterbalance the effects of climate change. Over three billion people depend on marine and coastal biodiversity for their livelihoods. However, today we are seeing 30 percent of the world's fish stocks overexploited, reaching below the level at which they can produce sustainable yields. Oceans also absorb about 30 percent of the carbon dioxide produced by humans, and we are seeing a 26 percent rise in ocean acidification since the beginning of the industrial revolution. Marine pollution, an overwhelming majority of which comes from land-based sources, is reaching alarming levels, with an average of 13,000 pieces of plastic litter to be found on every square kilometre of ocean. The SGDs aim to sustainably manage and protect marine coastal and ecosystems from pollution, as well as address the impacts of ocean acidification. Enhancing conservation and the sustainable use of ocean-based resources through international law will also helo mitigate some of the challenges facing our oceans.

Facts and Figures

Goal Targets

Why is it important?

Oceans provide key natural resources including food, medicines, biofules and other products. They help with the breakdown and removal of waste and pollution, and their ecosystems act sa buffers to reduce damage from storms. Maintaining healthy oceans supports climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts. And have you been to the seaside? It's also a great place for tourism and recreation. Even more, Marine Protected Areas contribute to poverty reduction by increasing fish catches and income, and improving health. They also help improve gender equality, as women do much of the work at small-scale fisheries. The marine environment is also home to a stunning variety of beautiful creatures, ranging from single-celled organisms to the biggest animal ever to have lived on the Earth - the blue whale. They are also home to coral reefs, one of the most diverse ecosystems on the planet. Careful management of this essential global resource is a key feature of a sustainable future.

What can you do to help?

For open ocean and deep sea areas, sustainability can be achieved only through increased international cooperation to protect vulnerable habitats. Establishing comprehensive, effective and equitably managed systems of government-protected areas should be pursued to conserve biodiversity and ensure a sustainable future for the fishing industry. On a local level, we should make ocean-friendly choices when buying products or eating food derived from oceans and consume only what we need. Selecting certified products is a good place to start. Making small changes in our daily lives, like taking public transport and unplugging electronics save energy. These actions reduce our carbon footprint, a factor that contributes to rising sea levels. We should eliminate plastic usage as much as possible and organize beach clean-ups. Most importantly, we can spread the message about how important marine life is and why we need to protect it.

Goal 15 - Life on Land

Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss.

Human life depends on the earth as much as the ocean for our sustenance and livelihoods. Plant life provides 80 percent of the human diet, and we rely on agriculture as an important economic resources. Forests cover 30 percent of the Earth's surface, provide vital habitats for millions of species, and important sources for clean air and water, as well as being crucial for combating climate change. Every year, 13 million hectares of forests are lost, while the persistent degradation of drylands has led to the desertification of 3.6 billion hectares, disproportionately affecting poor communities. While 15 percent of land is protected, biodiversity is still at risk. Nearly 7,000 species of animals and plants have been illegally traded. Wildlife trafficking not only erodes biodiversity, but creates insecurity, fuels conflict, and feeds corruption. Urgent action must be taken to reduce the loss of natural habitats and biodiversity which are part of our common heritage and support global food and water security, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and peace and security.

Facts and Figures

Forests

Desertification

Biodiversity

Goal Targets

Why is it important?

Forests cover nearly 31 percent of our planet's land area. From the air we breathe, to the water we drink, to the food we eat - forests sustain us. Around 1.6 billion people depend on forests for their livelihood. Almost 75 percent of the world's poor are affected directly by land degradation. Forests are home to more than 80 percent of all terrestrial species of animals, plants and insects. However, biodiversity is declining faster than any other time in human history. An estimated 20 percent of the Earth's land area was degraded between 2000 and 2015. Biodiversity and the ecosystem services it underpins can also be the basis for climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction strategies as they can deliver benefits that will increase the resilience of people to the impacts of climate change. Forests and nature are also important for recreation and mental well-being. In many cultures, natural landscapes are closely linked to spiritual values, religious belifs and traditional teachings. Sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, halt and reverse land degradation, halt biodiversity loss.

What can you do to help?

Inevitably, we change the ecosystems we are a part of through our presence - but we can make choices that either affirm diversity or devalue it. Some things we can do to help include recycling, eating a locally-based diet that is sustainably sourced, consuming only what we need, and limiting energy usage through efficient heating and cooling systems. We must also be respectful toward wildlife and only take part in ecotourism opportunities that are responsibly and ethically run in order to prevent wildlife disturbance. Well-managed protected areas support healthy ecosystems, which in turn keep people healthy. It is therefore critical to secure the involvement of the local communities in the development and management of these protected areas.

Goal 16 - Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions

Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels.

We cannot hope for sustainable development without peace, stability, human rights and effective governance, based on the rule of law. Yet our world is increasingly divided. Some regions enojoy peace, security and prosperity, while others fall into seemingly endless cycles of conflict and violence. This is not inevitable and must be addressed. Armed violence and insecurity have a destructive impact on a country's development, affecting economic growth, and often resulting in grievances that last for generations. Sexual violence, crime, exploitation and torture are also prevalent where there is conflict, or no rule of law, and countries must take measures to protect those who are most at risk. The SDGs aim to significantly reduce all forms of violence, and work with governments and communities to end conflict and insecurity. Promoting the rule of law and human rights are key to this process, as is reducing the flow of illicit arms and strengthening the participation of developing countries in the institutions of global governance.

Facts and Figures

Violence Against Children

Goal Targets

Why is it important?

Crimes that threaten the foundation of peaceful societies, including homicides, trafficking and other organized crimes, as well as discriminatory laws or practices, affect all countries. Even the world's greates democracies face major challenges in addressing corruption, crime and human rights violations for everyone at home. Access to justice for all, and building effective, accountable institutions at all levels.

What can you do to help?

Take a genuine interest in what your government is doing. Raise awareness in your community about the realities of violence and the importance of peacful and just societies, and identify how you can pursue the SDGs in your daily life. Exercise your right to hold your elected officials to account. Exercise your right to freedom of information and share your opinion with your elected representatives. Be the change - promote inclusion and respect towards people of different backgrounds, ethnic origins, religions, gender, sexual orientations or different opinions. Together, we can help to improve conditions for a life of dignity for all.

Goal 17 - Partnerships for the Goals

Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership sustainable development.

The SDGs can only be realized with strong global partnership and cooperation. Official Development Assistance remained steady but below target, at US $147 billion in 2017. While humanitarian crises brought on by conflict or natural disasters continue to demand more financial resources and aid. Many countries also require Official Development Assistance to encourage growth and trade. The world is more internconnected than ever. Improving access technology and knowledge is an important way to share ideas and foster innovation. Coordinating policies to help developing countries manage their debt, as well as promoting investment for the least developed, is vital for sustainable growth and development. The goals aim to enhance North-South and South-South cooperation by supporting national plans to achieve all the targets. Promoting international trade, and helping developing countries increase their exports is all part of achieving a universal rules-based and equitable trading system that is fair and open and benefits all.

Facts and Figures

Goal Targets

Finance

Technology

Capacity Building

Trade

Systemic Issues

Policy and Institutional Coherence
Multi-stakeholder Partnership
Data, Monitoring and Accountability

Why is it important?

We are all in this together. The Agenda, with its 17 Sustainable Development Goals, is universal and calls for action by all countries, both developed countries and developing countries, to ensure no one is left behind. In 2015, world leaders adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development that aims to end poverty, tackle inequalities and combat climate change. We need everyone to come together - governments, civil society, academia and the private sector - to achieve the sustainable development goals. Revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development.

What can you do to help?

Join/create a group in your local community that seeks to mobilize action on the implementation of the SDGs. Encourage your government to partner with businesses for the implementation of the SDGs. Register your initiatives on the SDGs Partnership Platform to inform, educate, network, and be inspired! Find Partnerships Here!

References

UN Sustainable Development Goals